Fresh homegrown parsnip

Parsnip

The parsnip is a root vegetable related to parsley and carrot. It is a biennial plant commonly grown as an annual crop and has long, tuberous cream-coloured roots and flesh, left in the ground to mature. It becomes sweeter in flavour after winter frosts. In its initial growing season, the plant has mid-green leaves.

Parsnip is high in minerals and vitamins, mainly potassium. It also consists of antioxidants and both insoluble and soluble dietary fibre, making it a beneficial food for maintaining health. Sometimes it is also used as a medicine for treating kidney disorders, jaundice, intermittent fever, etc.

Read on to know more!

Product Description

The parsnip is a root vegetable related to parsley and carrot. It is a biennial plant commonly grown as an annual crop and has long, tuberous cream-coloured roots and flesh, left in the ground to mature. It becomes sweeter in flavour after winter frosts. In its initial growing season, the plant has mid-green leaves.

Parsnip is native to Eurasia and was used as a vegetable since ancient times. It was cultivated by the Romans and was used as a sweetener before the onset of the European cane sugar.

 

Types of Parsnips:

  1. Harris Model Parsnips
  2. All American Parsnips
  3. Hollow Crown Parsnips
  4. Cobham Marrow Parsnips
  5. The Student Parsnips

 

As parsnips are related to carrots and comparatively sweeter in taste, they are used in similar ways especially when cooked. They can be baked, pureed, boiled, roasted, grilled, steamed or fried. They impart a rich flavour when used in stews, soups, and casseroles.

Sometimes parsnip is boiled and the solid portions are removed from the soup or stew, which leaves a more refined flavour behind than the whole root, and starch which thickens the dish. Roasted parsnip is considered a vital part of Christmas dinner in some parts of the world and frequently features in the traditional Sunday roast. Parsnips can also be fried or thinly sliced and made into crisps. They are also used to make a wine with a taste similar to Madeira.

Parsnip is high in minerals and vitamins, mainly potassium. It also consists of antioxidants and both insoluble and soluble dietary fibre, making it a beneficial food for maintaining health. Sometimes it is also used as a medicine for treating kidney disorders, jaundice, intermittent fever, etc.

Selection– Avoid large parsnips as they have a woody, bitter core. Choose parsnips that are small to medium in size, i.e., 5 to 10 inches long, and are not shrivelled. They should have firm flesh without any soft spots with an even yellowish-cream colour without any dark markings. If parsnips have their greens still attached, the greens should look fresh and not flaccid.

 

Storage– Store unwashed parsnips in a cool and dark place like carrots. Remove the greens before storing.

A half cup of cooked parsnip slices contains approximately:

  • 55 calories
  • 3 grams carbohydrates
  • 1 gram protein
  • 8 grams fiber
  • 1 milligrams vitamin C (17 percent DV)
  • 2 micrograms folate (11 percent DV)
  • 2 milligram manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 286 milligrams potassium (8 percent DV)
  • 6 milligrams magnesium (6 percent DV)
  • 5 milligram pantothenic acid (5 percent DV)
  • 8 milligrams phosphorus (5 percent DV)
  • milligram copper (5 percent DV)
  • 8 milligram vitamin E (4 percent DV)
  • milligram vitamin B6 (4 percent DV)
  • milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)
  • 6 milligram niacin (3 percent DV)
  • 9 milligrams calcium (3 percent DV)
  • 5 milligram iron (3 percent DV)
  • 3 micrograms selenium (2 percent DV)

 

https://draxe.com/parsnip-nutrition/

  1. Maintains heart health– Parsnip contains potassium that behaves like a vasodilator. It helps in preventing arteries and veins from tightening, thus, reducing blood pressure. Parsnip also contains folate which lowers the homocysteine levels in our blood and thus protects the heart. It also contains dietary fibre that lowers bad cholesterol levels.

 

  1. Maintains the digestive system– Dietary fibre content also helps in adding bulk to the stool by facilitating smooth movement of bowels through the digestive system, thus, preventing constipation and gastrointestinal disorders.

 

  1. Boosts Eye Health– As parsnip is high in vitamin C, it helps in preventing macular degeneration. People over the age of 60 are more likely to experience this degenerative eye issue, so parsnip consumption Is good for them.

 

  1. Prevents birth defects– The folate content of parsnips helps to reduce the chances of the development of neural tube defects in newborn babies. It is also useful for preventing postpartum depression in mothers who have given birth recently.

 

  1. Strengthens immunity– As parsnips are rich in anti-oxidants and other organic compounds, they protect us from various diseases. For example, Vitamin C and Vitamin E neutralizes the disease-causing free radicals and prevent them from causing harm. Vitamin C also helps in the production of white blood cells- our body’s line of defence.

 

  1. Helps in preventing cancer– Parsnips have anti-inflammatory properties. They consist of an active ingredient known as falcarindiol that can destroy cancer cells in the colon. This will help to reduce the chances of developing colon cancer.

 

  1. Helps to lose weight– Consuming parsnips makes you feel fuller for a longer period of time as they contain soluble fibre. This reduces your intake of food.

 

  1. Prevents anaemia– As they are rich in iron and Vitamins C and B9, parsnips can help in preventing anaemia, as these are important for the production of blood.

 

  1. Good for your bones and teeth– This vegetable is rich in calcium and also contains magnesium which helps in the proper absorption of calcium. Thus, it makes our bones and teeth healthier.

 

Sources:

https:/raxe.com/parsnip-nutrition/

https://www.lybrate.com/topic/benefits-of-parsnips-and-its-side-effects

https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/parsnips/

  1. Parsnip contains polyacetylene that results in cytotoxic activity. It is not recommended to individuals using anticancer agents.
  2. Parsnip plant can cause hypersensitivity reactions like oral allergy syndrome (OAS) and contact dermatitis if handled by some sensitive individuals.
  3. If someone is not used to eating fibre-rich foods, adding it in the diet may cause gas, bloating and cramps at first because of the high fibre content.

https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/parsnips/

https://draxe.com/parsnip-nutrition/

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