Collard Greens

Collard greens belong to the cruciferous family that includes vegetables such as kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, turnips, etc. They are also known as tree cabbage and are considered to be one of the oldest vegetables in the family. They are large, thick and green leaves with visible whitish green stem veins. Due to their resemblance to other cruciferous vegetables, they are sometimes mistaken as kale. However, one can differentiate between the two by looking at the leaves – kale’s leaves are curly with soft bumps on them.

Product Description

Collard greens belong to the cruciferous family that includes vegetables such as kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, turnips, etc. They are also known as tree cabbage and are considered to be one of the oldest vegetables in the family. They are large, thick and green leaves with visible whitish green stem veins. Due to their resemblance to other cruciferous vegetables, they are sometimes mistaken as kale. However, one can differentiate between the two by looking at the leaves – kale’s leaves are curly with soft bumps on them.

Collard greens have a different bitter taste than the one Brussels sprouts have because when picked after the first frost, the bitter compound reacts to low temperatures in order to protect the plant making it more palatable. Young leaves need lesser cooking time while matured ones need to be cooked for a longer time in order to soften them.

In Kashmir, both, the leaves and roots of collard greens are consumed and included in most of the meals. The small leaves are known as ‘kaanyilhaakh’ and the common dish made by using it is ‘haakrus’, which is a soup of these leaves cooked in water, oil, salt and many spices accompanied by rice. Also, they are used in non-vegetarian dishes with meat (maaztihaakh) and fish (haakhgaade). They are often fermented to form a popular pickle known as haak-e-achaar.

In different regions of world Collard greens are known by different names, like in the UK they are called ‘Spring Greens’ and used just like cabbage, whereas in Tanzania and Kenya they are known as ‘sukuma wiki’ and accompany various dishes like meat and ‘ugali’. In Southern U.S. cuisine, they are mixed with similar green leafy vegetables like kale, spinach, turnip greens and mustard greens forming a dish known as ‘mixed greens’. There is a tradition in which collard leaves are eaten in New Year’s Day along with field peas, cornbread and black-eyed peas, as it is believed that it would bring wealth in the upcoming year.

Collard greens are highly nutritious as they contain a large number of vitamins and minerals, preventing many ailments. Read about the health benefits of Collard greens in the ‘Health Benefits’ section.

Selection– Choose crisp and fresh leaves that are free of damage and bruises. Small ones are tender and less bitter, whereas larger ones are harder and more bitter.

Storage– Keep them in a plastic bag with holes in the refrigerator so that they remain crisp.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 100 g – collard greens
Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 20

Calories 42

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 2.24g 3%
Saturated Fat 0.4g 2%
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.722g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.918g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 269mg 11%
Potassium 113mg
Total Carbohydrate 4.81g 2%
Dietary Fiber 2.7g 11%
Sugars 0.39g
Protein 2.05g
Vitamin A 159% Vitamin C 30%
Calcium 14% Iron 6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

 

Source: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/generic/collards-cooked-ns-as-to-fat-added-in-cooking?portionid=54551&portionamount=100.000

  • Collard greens contain glucosinolates that are compounds containing sulphur. They help to prevent several types of cancers like lung and digestive tract cancer.
  • Because of the presence of the antioxidant mineral manganese, it protects cells and DNA from radical damage that disrupts normal cell activity and cause them to mutate.
  • Collard leaves bind to bile acid which is actually fat, thus encouraging its elimination and lowering cholesterol levels in the blood.
  • As collard greens are abundant with vitamin K, it helps in preventing calcification of blood vessels, thus maintaining cardiovascular health.
  • Collard greens offer a healthy weight loss diet as they contain dietary fibre which binds to fats in the digestive tract like LDL (bad cholesterol) and prevents the body from absorbing all of them.
  • They relieve constipation as they contain dietary fibre which helps in eliminating waste.
  • Consumption of Vitamin K present in collard greens lowers the risk of bone fracture and reduces the urine excretion of calcium thus maintaining healthy bones.
  • Due to the presence of dietary fibre in collard greens, they lower the blood glucose levels which is helpful for treating diabetes.
  • The Vitamin A content of collard greens benefits the skin and hair as it is needed for sebum production which keeps hair moisturized and vital for growth of skin and hair tissue.

 

Sources:

https://www.natureword.com/tag/collard-greens-side-effects/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277957.php

  • The high fibre content in collard greens stops it from fully breaking down or being digested before reaching the colon, thus increasing intestinal gas and giving a bloating sensation.
  • People taking blood thinning medications should usually not consume greens as it may make the medication ineffective.

 

Sources:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/500244-how-to-cook-1-lb-of-collard-greens-in-a-slow-cooker/

http://www.diethealthclub.com/health-food/collard-greens.html

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